Set Currency:
Your Basket - 0 Items - £0.00 Checkout

Long Distance Hypertourer Sample

Just in for evaluation is the first model of our long distance hyper touring range. Designed for big rides on good roads for long distances.

Long Distance Hypertourer Sample

With clearance up to 700x34 with mudguards, rack and pannier mounts, and a tired-rider-friendly 71deg head angle this bike just eats up the road for those long days or high speed rougher twisty descents.

Modifications being discussed already:-
1) External gear cables
2) Extra bosses on top tube for "fuel cell" type bag.

Provisional name "Gradbach"

No news on delivery time or pricing yet but we’re keen to hear what you think. Leave your comments below

23 May 2019

Comments

  • Anonymous
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Great Idea Planet X Definitely for me in black with Shimano.

  • Petr G
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    I love it as it is!!! let me know, when the testing bike is going for sale ;-)

  • Gilomen D
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Waouw jen veux un !

  • Rachel S
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    I love it and would definitely buy one-but why (again) are your cyclocross bikes only on a 51cm plus size? Please can you make it in a 48?!!! And in Fluro yellow and Id really be dancing.

  • Adam P
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Keep cables internal, just don't split cable housing. Instead full cable housing from snifter do rear derailleur and to bottom of BB for FD. Dynamo cable routing inside fork and outside bosses would be nice touch.

  • Alain B
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Love it! But definitively with outer cable routing and mechanic disk brakes' option.

  • Garry P
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    - bottle / anything cage mounts on fork would be very very nice - light mounting on fork crown - dynamo routing would be very nice - external cable mounts for full outers would make sense - under down tube bottle cage mount if it doesnt have it already - having 3 bottle bosses instead of the normal 2 in each position to give a high and low mounting option for bottles, particularly useful with frame bags etc. Love the orange.

  • stephen h
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Could I get it with straight bars?

  • Brad C
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    External cabling seems like a good idea as mentioned. Great looking bike and colour choice is awesome.

  • NEIL P
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Having rebuilt a Dawes Galaxy recently I can see the appeal of this bike, however would want front carrier mounts

  • Peter G
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    looks the nuts to me,does it come in matt black and would you like me to test one for you?

  • Andrew D
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks nice. I'm not convinced about the head angle on a road focussed bike. Snappier bikes are more fun! Also no dropped seat stays? Not sure of the benefit but they look cool. Agree on tyre clearance, my monster-crosser has 42 mm tyres and guards.

  • Andrew O
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks great, would like clearance for 40mm for gravel riding as well. Prefer internal cables.

  • Ken A
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    It's important to resist the temptation to keep adding more and making it bombproof. Weight is still a key factor. I'd love to know what the current planned weight is. Remember strong light cheap. Choose any 2. If you get close to all 3 it's a guaranteed hit.

  • Alan B
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks like a great bike - most def need external cables and non hydraulic brakes (but stick with the discs). Hopefully an option of a 1x groupset too? Ignore people that want steel/aluminium etc forks.......youre never going to please everyone (and there are those that will never be pleased) Lets face it - those of us that do long distance riding will always change something to suit our personal style/needs. A great starting point

  • Mr A B
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Some nice touches, but for me - AND, I suspect many other more mature riders - the stem is too low and you need to include a means of extending it (extra height/spacers) to make the handlebar height more neck-friendly! Tyre clearance up to 32 mm. is fine - allows the latest Continental GP 5000 32 mm. tyres, which I've found to be super-comfortable and responsive. Nice job, guys, just don't know how you do it for the price !!

  • Graham H
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Hyper tourer? Implies hyper miles in hyper places. Therefore keep servicing simple: Threaded BB, option of mechanical or hydraulic disc, lots if bosses on seat top, down tube, under down tube near BB, on fork legs. Mudguard and pannier mounts, spare spoke brackets on seat stays. External cabling or if internal then fit internal cable routing. Minimum diameter seat tube for nicer bump absorption. Fit it with DH bike headset bearings or Chris King option. Option of QR or thru-axle. Seat post clamp slot forward facing or with waterproof cover. Option of SRAM 1X or Shimano GX. Option of flared or std drop bars. Option of dynamo lights.

  • Cary W
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    The bike could ideally use mounts for all kinds of front racks on the fork and more than one boss at the rear. Mounting a mudguard and a rear rack on the same boss is not optimal. Also, I'd suggest that the frame needs way more stack height to allow bars up level with the saddle without the use of crazy riser stems. Unless we're talking about the MAMIL definition of touring (ie. There's racing or training for racing, everything else is "touring".) In which case... nevermind.

  • Harry W
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    External cabling, 40mm clearances, no top tube bottle cage, well arranged mounts on forks & rear triangle for both panniers & guards.

  • Gerard B
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks a cracking bike guys, it ticks a lot of boxes, when can I get one....

  • Stuart W
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    For a smooth road tourer, this looks pretty much right. External cable routing might be more functional, but I have never broken a cable on a road bike. That said, minimising points of water ingress to the frame is always a good idea on a touring bike. I would appreciate a bento box type mount (similar to tri bikes) on the front of the top tube for gels, bars and salt caps. I don't always want to have to stop to grab a snack. Tyre and mudguard clearance a must and bosses for front low-rider rack on the fork is also a necessity. Whilst storage within the main triangle seems to be the current trend, I have always toured on compact frame bikes due to stand-over height (and the ability to awkwardly clamber over the middle of the frame rather than trying to swing my leg over the rear panniers and rack bag). Easy stand-over height becomes a real necessity after long rides, when leg cramps set in. It is the difference between getting off the bike and falling over still on it. I am fine with hydraulic brakes on a touring bike for smoother roads as chances are that if you cannot fix it, a bike shop will not be too far away. Handlebar height looks a little low on the demo model, but maybe that is due to the height of the saddle. I tend to have my bar/saddle height set at about the same as my endurance bike. Any chance of 46cm wide handlebar option?

  • Neil W
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Gradbach after the village on staffordshire/cheshire border?

  • Paul G
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Great looking bike. Great concept. Gravel-Audax? Prefer internal cabling but with access match for routing simplicity. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE if you make it, make it in sizes large enough for taller riders. Your bikes are generally excellent, but just too small... E.g.. pickenflick tops out at 58cm... I tried... WAY too small. Please consider taking sizes for this exciting machine up to a more representative 61cm. Many thanks

  • Craig B
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    External cables, threaded bottom bracket for easy maintenance. More tyre clearance. 650b wheel compatible. Regular quick release dropouts non of these thru axles. Nice simple but very effective bike.

  • Pamela B
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Everything I wanted for a winter/utility/tourer bike but could never find with a carbon frame. Would buy 2 frames if they were available at a sensible price and switch out the current ally frames on the better half's and mine.

  • David J
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Altho' spec not given, I rather assume that like 99% of all current bikes gearing no way low enough for the purpose - nor indeed for older and/or less healthy riders on any terrain. 25" maybe? Minimum 20" at least is what is needed. I rather assume that makers discontinued triples simply to drive people to electrics - margins so much better!

  • David J
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Altho' spec not given, I rather assume that like 99% of all current bikes gearing no way low enough for the purpose - nor indeed for older and/or less healthy riders on any terrain. 25" maybe? Minimum 20" at least is what is needed. I rather assume that makers discontinued triples simply to drive people to electrics - margins so much better!

  • Andrew C
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Oh also to add that I like this idea because it's still basically a road bike but can handle luggage and some light detours off. Lots of the adventure bikes look great for the dirt part but I'd be in the niche that wants a good endurance road bike that allows some adventure / touring rather than being strictly for road and what you can carry in your jersey pockets.

  • jeppe k
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    It looks good, but why not add some bosses on the fork? Is it a bad idea with carbon forks? I think "fuel cell" type bags look way better without the straps, so I vote for top tube bosses.

  • Jane S
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Hi I like it. I would suggest a couple of low cost mods that would make the bike ultra flexible. Front forks, triple bosses to accommodate gorilla cage type mounts + the center boss is the best place to attach full mudguard stays. With carbon they are easy and low cost to add as you would use use use rivnuts bonded in. Re Rear mounting point for mudguards I see one but I would suggest maybe duel mounting points as this makes mounting racks easier. to keep the bike supper flexible you could add a bottle boss to down tube to facilitate a real low mount point for a bottle cage. If you are using a a top tube bag or a seat tube wedge bag the will foul a 750ml bottle so the supper low mount option solves that on a small frame. I agree with the external cable routing however you will have to be careful with the under down tube cage and the cable eyes for the rear disk brake and the gear cable run ( I modded a Elite Ciussi get round the issue) If you could source some supper compact or sub compact chain sets that would be a good option I took one of your Holdsworth Elite frames and did the fork mod and extra bottle cage mounts for a bit of lightweight touring. I can send some pictures if your interested. Best Regards Peter Nichols Luxembourg

  • Andrew C
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Nice - sounds like my sort of bike. I'd say keep it simple and allow low end groupset options like Sora, which is more than good enough for non competitve riding and just makes getting it dirty and wearing it out with regular miles for winter / commutes doesn't cost you much in chains, cassettes, etc. Keep to threaded BB too. I wonder, what would be key differences to the London Road? Overall looks like a great concept and would make my n + 1 list.

  • Phil S
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Consider upping maximum tyre clearance to 40mm with mudguards. add anything cage bosses on both fork legs. Extra bosses on top tube for fuel tank are a good idea, Consider much shorter and steeper stem paired with wide flared bars.

  • Tim M
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Sounds like a really helpful bike for dedicated Audaxing. However, a flat top bar would probably be more helpful for easier attachment of feed bags- and a slope down to a lower seat post joint helps with larger seatpost bags. I wold agree with having external gear cables and also offering a sub compact chainset might appeal to the Audax crew and I wouldn't discount the benefits of things like an option of having a dynamo hub wheel option and associated mounts for dynamo lights, wider handlebar or flared bar options for those looking to have handlebar bags - and you haven't mentioned material build (I'm guessing it's alloy?). Would love to try one though.

  • Sean B
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks great. Does it have front pannier mounts?

  • Soren E
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Great idea, just what I would be looking for. Definitely with external gear cable for easier service access on the road. Extra bosses on top tube, hmm ? Any standard available for "fuel cell" type bag ? Usually, they are just attached but not really securely by velcro straps. I will be doing Paris-Brest-Paris in August. Will you have one ready by then. If not, my Holdsworth 953 Strada will surely do a wonderful job. Best Regards from Denmark and Soren

  • wayne s
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Having just doing a 300 mile bikepacking on Isle of Skye, Harris and Lewis on a PX Uncle John, i think i am qualified to comment. Yes the carbon frame, but with external cabling, top tube bottle mount would be of benefit. I had 40mm tyres on my bike and feel as the ability to put tyres on to this width would be beneficial. Otherthan that, seems a cracker to me. Wayne Sanderson

  • nick e
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    will it come with the option of TRP mechanical disc brakes, long distance touring with hydraulic brakes is a none starter for me. Nick

  • james t
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks good! Fancy sending me a small to test for you? ;)

  • Richard M
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Good looking bike personally I would keep with the internal cabling looks much better to the eye. How often does a cable break on the road? Would make a great winter bike too..

  • Leo H
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Why don't you create a bike for the real rough roads like highway forty in Argentina or the roads of Chatjikistan/Kirgistan/Tibet. I would never go there with a carbon fork. Put on a steel fork with bosses or at least a quality fork made of Aluminium. I,m planning a trip from Denmark to Marocco and have been looking at the different possibilities you offer bikewise. two things are holding me back from buying. 1. The carbon forks 2. the disc brakes. Put on some quality V brakes or put on a handlebar that fits with the Magura H33/22/11 For a touring bike you should keep it as simple as possible. It sucks to be way up in shit creek without the proper tools or the knowledge to repair it not to mention to find a bikeshop and mechanic that can help you.

  • CLAIRE D
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks great. External cables are a good idea. Rim brake option would be good too (an an XS frame - this seems to be an area that is really popular with females and your smallest frame is just that bit to big for me). What frame material is proposed? Ive been on the look out for a long distance Audax bike and realised that weight is also important with all the evil hills they throw in! Look forward to the updates.

  • Rich Y
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks nice but suspect with so many Gravel / Adventure type bikes on the market, having a dedicated road tourer is limiting its appeal somewhat. Maybe you'd be better offering a Gravel bike package with 2 sets of wheels + tyres for easy changes for weekday commutes and weekend adventures ?

  • Mike G
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Want one! Just looking for something like this - I've been using my Pickenflick but it's missing the mounts. Also, I used to go Gradbach on cub/scout camps so the name is Awesome!!!!

  • george p
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    no toe overlap when running mudguards - even on largest tyre size set up good clearance between chainrings and stays - so in the event of a dropped chain there is no chance of it getting stuck top tube mounts for fuel cell bags is a very good suggestion external cables - if you do these should be full length housing type fittings keeping everything running as soon as possible. pump peg? my assumptions that you've already covered, bolt thru axles, 27.2 seat post, DI2 compatibility, threaded BB, proper mudguard mounts that don't foul discs / proper mounts on the forks, seat tube clamp - forward facing slot

  • Stephen O
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Looks good. Hole through the fork crown for dynamo lights?

  • philip a
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Beast of a colour! Good to see 105 with hydraulic discs. Perhaps time to upgrade from my RT85?

  • Dave C
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Would suggest it needs bigger tyre clearance, otherwise, sweet......

  • john s
    •  1
    •  2
    •  3
    •  4
    •  5

    Great concept. Clean bike. Nice to see something compatible with a double up front. External cable routing and the extra bosses is a great idea.